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Saturday, 9 January 2016

Hit a ball; Sepia Saturday 312 : Saturday 9th January 2016






 Tennis ball;
Tennis balls legacy can be traced back to the 12th century. In Scotland,  in the 15th century,  Tennis balls were made from leather stuffed with hair or wool. The stomach of a sheep or goat that was wrapped with wool and tied with rope. Later in the 18th century, strips of wool were wound round a nucleus made of cork. Cork core Tennis balls with  cloth covering are still used in the original game of tennis, known as Real Tennis.
1870 brought a change again, as vulcanized rubber was first used to manufacture tennis balls.  Improvements were being made,by wrapping flannel around the surface of the ball. Later, felt was used on the exterior. Pressurized tennis balls  are being used today.

Yellow Tennis balls were introduced in 1972 as “Optic Yellow” as it was the easiest color to be seen on color television sets.  Before then most balls were colored white or black, depending of the colour of the court. I remember playing with white Tennis balls.

The surface of the ball affects the speed and flight path. Fluffed up fuzz will decrease the ball’s speed. Pro tennis players are fuzzy and demand several balls before finding the right one. Players are looking for a ball that has the greatest amount of fuzz laying flat against its surface.
If you are unsatisfied with your serve, blame the fuzz.



19 comments:

  1. White tenns balls and wooden raquets date my tennis playing days back to the 1960s!

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  2. I remember only the bright yellow balls, but I didn't play the game...only watched.

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  3. Amazing, so much I learned from your lovely post, thank you.

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  4. I remember greenish/yellow balls used by my daughter with her dogs.

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  5. Ah, an educational post, and I did play a bit of wood frame racket in the 60s. Very glad to know about the fuzz. One bit of trivia can go a long way

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  6. I had white balls too for the brief time I dabbled in tennis. There's so much technology involved with sports balls now...our deflate gate scandal was a real learning experience.

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  7. We bought a pack of different colored tennis balls for our dog. The yellow ones made sense with tv as you can't see them very well anyway. Gold balls would never be seen without replay slow motion. Nice stuff to know.

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  8. My experience with tennis balls comes from a different game played with my late dog, Tanner, who by the end of his life had accumulated over 6 dozen scattered in baskets and under furniture around the house. He was as picky about new balls as any tennis pro, and these required careful attention to acquire the proper dog slime squishyness. The best ones were those he found in the Kudzu jungle below the tennis courts. He never failed to retrieve two or three on every walk around the courts.

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    1. You must so miss the walks with him on his mission, seek and find.

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  9. An interesting lesson. When I played tennis during physical education in high school we had white balls. I'm glad we only had to play it for two weeks because I was not a fan. In fact I still carry a dark scar from where my thumbnail dug into the side of my knee while trying to return a serve! You mentioned tennis got its start in the 12th century but didn't go on to elaborate on that particular century, so now I'll have to do some research, I guess. :)

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    1. It is believed, the game's ancient origin’s lay in 12th century northern France. A ball was struck with the palm of the hand. Louis X of France liked to play le jeu de paume ("game of the palm"), this game evolved into real tennis. Louis did not want to play outdoor’s , he had made indoor, enclosed courts,around the end of the 13th century. With time this game and design of the courts, spread across royal palaces all over Europe.[
      n the 16th century rackets came into use, and the game was called "tennis", from the Old French term tenez, which can be translated as "hold!", "receive!" or "take“.

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  10. I had completely forgotten about white balls. How easily we are led and converted. - boundforoz. This site won;t let me use my normal Wordpress sign in - makes me use Google

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  11. So it wasn’t that I was a failure - it was the fuzz!

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  12. Leather and woollen tennis balls would have been heavy and without much of a bounce!

    I remember the wooden tennis racquets well.

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