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Saturday, 14 May 2016

Sepia Saturday 330; 14. May 2016 A famous golfball;

Our theme image this week shows a type-setter at work;  I have chosen the type writer for this week's Sepia Saturday.




Instead of the "basket" of individual typebars that swung up to strike the ribbon and page in a traditional typewriter, the Selectric had a type element (frequently called a "typeball", or more informally, a "golf ball") that rotated and pivoted to the correct position before striking. The type element could be easily changed so as to print different fonts in the same document, resurrecting a capability that had been pioneered by the Blickensderfer typewriter 60 years before. The Selectric also replaced the traditional typewriter's moving carriage with a paper roller ("platen") that stayed in position while the typeball and ribbon mechanism moved from side to side.






Selectrics and their descendants eventually captured 75 percent of the United States market for electric typewriters used in business.
The Selectric typewriter was introduced on 23 July 1961. Its industrial design is credited to influential American designer Eliot Noyes. 
The Selectric remained unchanged until 1971 when the Selectric II was introduced. From then on practically every year a new, improved one was introduced. Business was booming. 





I remember proud secretaries wearing a “type ball/golfball necklace in gold or silver.

There were also competitions, between  best secretaries, The winner received a golfball necklace.





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Sepia Saturday 330 : 14 May 2016





Courtesy Wikipedia/Google

14 comments:

  1. I remember a Selectric that worked on a memory system, and you had to program a "stop" code into the type; the machine would stop, you could change the ball to italic (or bold), then start it up again. Seems like a hundred years ago, though, when you compare it to today's computerized typesetting machines.

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  2. I don't remember those necklaces. They're great!

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  3. I never saw one of those necklaces but how cute! I loved having a typewriter with several different balls for different fonts. My last portable typewriter had a plastic wheel rather than ball, and we had a couple different fonts.

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  4. The picture of the Selectric - even to its being green - brought back memories! I typed on a machine just like it. I don't remember having to change the ball for any reason, however? And like others, I never saw any necklaces like the ones you've shown here. Cute. But I wasn't a secretary, so maybe that's why?

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  5. Whata beautiful piece of jewellery - of course they would be proud of them! We do take our modern keyboards for granted sometimes don’t we?

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  6. Deb, Helen, Wendy, La Nightingail, Little Nell; thank you for your interesting contributions to my post.

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  7. I vaguely remember the Selectric, but not sure in which of my incarnations used the Selectric. In fact it may have been in my ICS days when I had secretaries to do my typing -- they wouldn't let me near their typewriters. Interesting memories.

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    1. Some secretaries used to be very possessive of their typewriter and their boss, running the office with an iron fist!

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  8. Yes, I sure used many Selectrics whenever I worked as a secretary or later an Administrative Assistant, and often even as a temp for a few weeks after I moved to a new town. I also owned a portable Brother typewriter with a ball to type with in the 80s. Thanks for the memories!

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    1. I thought I would nudge some memories.

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  9. I loved the Selectric. I remember my dad had a couple at his office. I begged him to bring one home so I could type my resume on it. After manual typewriters it was so nice to be able to use less force to hit the keys. And the sound it made was wonderful.

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    1. The selectric must have made a big difference for the typists. In my last year in secondary school we had a selective to learn typing. I thought it would be good to know!
      The typewriter was very old, high and black, it rattled and clunked and one could expect fumes coming out, it had to be so aggressively attacked.

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  10. I don't remember those necklaces either. Aren't they neat? I didn't realise you could get different fonts on the balls but it makes sense.

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    1. Alex Daw, I love letters and words, would love a golfball necklace.

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