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Saturday, October 27, 2012

Sepia Saturday 149;



Aptly described as ‘gifts from the earth’, thermal springs occur in many parts of New Zealand. Most are scattered throughout the Taupo Volcanic Zone in the central North Island, but some are in areas of extinct volcanic activity such as Northland, the Coromandel Peninsula and the Bay of Plenty. Others lie in non-volcanic areas, along faultlines, particularly in Westland and North Canterbury. They are formed when rainwater seeps down through rock towards the heat source deep beneath the surface and then rises again. The hot water dissolves minerals in the rock, and the mineral content as well as the temperature of hot springs varies according to locality.

http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/thermal-pools-and-spas




 Mud is bubbling;


Water Steaming;


Hot sulfurous lake;

©Photos/ Ts Rotorua, New Zealand;


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20 comments:

  1. The shoes seem so incongruous, but obviously needed to protect the feet from the rocks.

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    1. Perhaps they left them on for fun; they look a bit mischievous.

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  2. Thank goodness for murky water. I know that a lot of classy spas offer mud treatments, so that natural bubbling mud spring must have appealed to a lot of people.

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    1. Ha Wendy, right we do not want any revelations!

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  3. I love the boots. It is an interesting geological country.

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    1. Diane; yes, it is beautiful, but the earthquakes. It is quite scary walking on ground that is bubbling and everywhere smoke from the bowels of the earth.

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  4. That first picture is a gem! I do a lot of walking on volcanic rock here in Lanzarote and believe me you would need your boots on if you didn't want your feet cut to ribbons. The two jolly travellers certainly seem to think it was worth it.

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    1. Marilyn, like walking on the reef.

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  5. A friend of mine has just emigrated to NZ so you have made me doubly envious of him as I am sure he will visit such places. I assume the sulphourous lake pons a bit.

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    1. Bob, the whole area does, but one gets used to it!

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  6. There is a lesson here. Whatever you do in life, keep your shoes on!
    This first picture is an absolute gem.

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    1. Peter thank you, yes, it makes it easier when one has to run.

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  7. That mud bubbling almost looks dangerous! And the boots on those fellows in the first photo? So funny!

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  8. Jana, Yes, it is dangerous, the whole pool bubbles, in a way fascinating.

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  9. Those men seem intent on keeping their boots dry. But how do you get in that position without getting your boots wet?

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  10. I'm with Kathy, I also wondered how the men got into the water without getting their shoes wet. Funny photo!

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  11. Oh my this was just too cool! They sure had a great time in the old mud bath!

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  12. We have many hot springs in Oregon, and enjoy visiting them when we have the chance. Those guys wearing their boots have a great idea, but I wouldn't want to have to wear them on the hike back to the car. I have never been in a mud bath before.

    Great post!

    Kathy M.

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  13. that first photo is hilarious. they look so uncomfortable.
    Nancy

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  14. They sure look like they were enjoying themselves. I always think of Snow Monkeys when I hear the term "hot springs".
    I imagine it would be hard to extract oneself from that position without getting your boots wet.

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