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Saturday, May 25, 2013

Sepia Saturday 178; Portraiture;


My grandmother Franziska born 1889 and died 1922 shortly after her last son was born. He is still alive and well. I don't know when this photo was taken. She married in 1914. She had five of her children before she was married to her husband. It was the custom,women  were not shunned when they had children out of wedlock. Then she had 5 more.Two boys died as babies, 2 boys died in WW 2. Her Mother was Theresia Marchetti-Schneeberger, she had two daughters, my grandmother Franziska and Aloisia who went to live in Italy.
Original colour of the portrait




My Mother Rosalia born 1910. I like this portrait from 1929 very much. She was always an elegant lady.She was also a very strong woman. I remember the scarf and the lavender violet brooch. It was made from velvet and tucked softly into a lavender box. Original colour of  the portrait.



Myself,  1959, oh my hairdo! That is the original colour of the portrait.



Marie-Louise 1989, my first born daughter;
Portrait original colour changed to sepia. Unfortunately there are some white age spots on the photo.



 Raphaelle Portia 2012,  her daughter, my first grand daughter.
Portrait original colour.
©

As it is said so eloquently in Latin

TEMPUS FUGIT

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www.sepiasaturday.blogspot.com




©Photos/Text Ts

20 comments:

  1. All those generations! Wonderful portraits and stories. You and your daughter have beautiful teeth and smiles.

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    1. Wendy, thank you so much for your friendly comment.

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  2. I think that second portrait, from 1929, has what I think is referred to as a linen finish, particularly common during the wars. It's particularly difficult to scan if your objective is to remove the patterned finish from your image, but I rather like the feel of the image. I agree, a very elegant portrait - I can imagine her stepping strait into a chauffered limousine and being sped away.

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    1. I also thank you Brett for the explanation. I have several photos like this, with the scans not looking as good at the original.

      Any tips for improving scans?

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    2. I think it's very difficult, because of the very nature of the undulating surface generated by the linen finish, which cause unwanted reflections whatever the angle of the illuminating light. Perhaps it is better to accept the "imperfection" and think of it more as part of the attractiveness of the image.

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    3. I meant to say, "particularly common between the wars."

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  3. Brett, thank you. I am glad you told me about the linen finish, as I was wondering what it was. I quite like it, it gives the picture its substance. Yes, my mother was a bit a flapper.

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  4. Lovely women, all of you!

    And thanks to Brett for the explanation about the linen finish. I have a couple of photos of my grandmother in that time frame that when I scanned had that same finish appear on the screen. I tried to get rid of it, but guess I will learn to love it as it is!

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    1. Teresa, I think this imperfection gives the picture its old charm. I don't mind it.

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  5. There are good genes in your family. You are gorgeous in that photo. Glowing.

    A great series of photos.

    Sharon

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  6. Five generations? Oh, that's so wonderful!
    And all are beautiful women...

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  7. The eyes have it through the generations. Beautiful series of photos.

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  8. I agree - a beautiful set of portraits on family members down the generations.

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  9. Your series of photos really demonstrates how portrait styles have changed over time.

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  10. It would be easy to get rid of those white spots on Marie-Louise's photo with Photoshop or similar software, and then just have the photo re-printed from the file.

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    1. Nigel, thank you, I shall do this.

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    2. What a fabulous post : styles change and photographic processes change but something of the person - the joy, the friendliness - marches straight down the genetic path.

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  11. All wonderful portraits through the generations! Your grandmother's life lost too soon - 10 births by the age of 33 if my math is correct. How sad for her family to lose their mother while still so young.

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