Tuesday, 25 April 2017

Sunday, visiting Murwillumbah Regional Art Gallery.

Art is life;

Mount Warning is dominating the beautiful rural area of  the Tweed Valley.

The name Murwillumbah derives from an Aboriginal word meaning "camping place" – from Murrie, meaning "aboriginal people", Wolli, "a camp"; and Bab, "the place of". Nearby Mount Warning and its attendant national park are known as Wollumbin, meaning "Cloud Catcher", in the Bundjalung language.

The day was a bit moody, but Mount Warning showed its best side.

Murwillumbah is a town in far north-eastern New South Wales, Australia, in the Tweed Shire, on the Tweed River, 848 km north-east of Sydney, 13 km south of the Queensland border and 132 km south of Brisbane.

Murwillumbah, a few snippets  from time passed.

Originally the area was home to the indigenous Bundjalung tribe.

European settlement came in the latter 19th century, with the name Murwillumbah  was the aboriginal name of the tribal lands between what is now the Tweed and Rous Rivers.

The first commercial maritime vessel navigated the Tweed River in 1868 and the cultivation of sugar cane and the surveying of the town soon followed.

Shortly before the turn of the century Murwillumbah became the terminus for the NSW North Coast railway line.

In 1907 most of the town’s business district was razed by a devastating fire.

But typical of the Australian country people’s resilience, the town was rebuilt with many fine buildings from that period still in evidence today.

Stormy weather - In 1954 Murwillumbah faced devastation once again as the worst flood in its history inundated the business district and low lying areas around the town.

Water levels reached the awnings of many businesses in Main Street. In 1956 the town was again awash with another major flood, a scene repeated in 1974. Since then levee walls and banks have been constructed to lessen nature’s onslaught.

Rocks as sculptures. Make you smile.

Having lived on a grazing property, rural countryside, grazing cattle, peaceful, as life should be, love  it.

Annexed to the gallery at the back is a neat small building where artists can sketch the country side.

©Photos/Text TS