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Saturday, 28 July 2012

Sepia Saturday 136; Bikes;

Cricket, basketball. baseball etc;  are anathema  for me, never enjoyed games like this. In younger years, my girlfriends used to go and watch the local soccer match, but that was just to watch the boys!  I could not think of anything more boring to go and watch any games.
I like bikes, but would not watch " the tours"! My middle daughter is a great bike enthusiast; when ever possible she rides her bike.


This time I let the colour photos to do the talking, because I think with this modern gear and bikes Sepia would not suit.



Here she is, left,  on a charity ride.


I think this is in Western Australia; she cycled with a group from Brooms to Perth.
Next year is a bigger tour on the books, about 6 weeks cycling. As she is as enthusiastic about her work as about cycling her CEO gave her two extra weeks holidays...for the trip.


Her bikes are part of her car!


There are also moments like this one...



It must have been so much fun!

Penny-farthing, high wheel, high wheeler, and ordinary are all terms used to describe a type of bicycle with a large front wheel and a much smaller rear wheel that was popular after the boneshaker, until the development of the safety bicycle, in the 1880s
They were the first machines to be called "bicycles.
Although they are now most commonly known as "penny-farthings", this term was probably not used until they were nearly outdated; the first recorded print reference is 1891 in Bicycling News. It comes from the British penny and farthing coins, one much larger than the other, so that the side view resembles a penny leading a farthing. For most of their reign, they were simply known as "bicycles". In the late 1890s, the retronym "ordinary" began to be used, to distinguish them from the emerging safety bicycles and this term or Hi-wheel (and variants) is preferred by many modern enthusiasts
About 1870, James Starley, described as the father of the bicycle industry, and others began producing bicycles based on the French boneshaker but with front wheels of increasing size,[ because larger front wheels, up to 1.5 m (60 in) in diameter, enabled higher speeds on bicycles limited to direct drive. In 1878, Albert Pope began manufacturing the Columbia bicycle outside of Boston, starting their two-decade heyday in America.[
Although the trend was short-lived, the penny-farthing became a symbol of the late Victorian era. Its popularity also coincided with the birth of cycling as a sport.



Not bad for an outing!

Penny Farthing  courtesy Wikipedia.

Please go and enjoy Sepia Saturday   



12 comments:

  1. Those penny-farthings might have been fun - but cycling home from the pub late on Friday night : no thanks. A thoroughly entertaining post.

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    1. Alan, you are right cycling home from the pub on one of those could pose a few problems!

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  2. Great tribute to bike enthusiasts. I always wonder how charity riders and racers can stand those tiny seats. My husband and I did a 17-mile trail-bike ride once and I thought I'd die near the end, not from pedaling but from sitting!

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    1. My bikes had all normal saddles and even those could have been more comfortable!

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  3. I did a Sepia Saturday post entitled 'Get On Your Bike' some time ago (http://bobscotney.blogspot.co.uk/2011/02/its-sepia-saturday-get-on-your-bike.html)I found your last picture at the US Libary of Congress. I've always regarded cycling as savage amusement so I can only admire the performance of your daughter.
    The Olympic 250km cycle road race is on today and due to finish soon with Team GB hoping for gold.

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    1. Bob, that was a fun post, get on your bike. I loved to bike, especially downwards!

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  4. This was great! I would hate to fall off one of those things. I am happy for your daughter that she gets to follow her dream and that she works for a company that supports it.

    Kathy M.

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    1. Kathy, you are so kind; thank you.

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  5. Great post. Bike riding is a wonderful sport. I used to bike a lot before knee surgery. Could probably still do it but I am too afraid to even try. Can't imagine a store bought knee hitting the concrete. Kudos for your daughter.
    QMM

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    1. Peggy, no, I do not think it would be a good idea, or then with a three wheeler! I think they are getting quite popular.

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  6. I bet you're proud of your daughter! I have the greatest respect for cyclists,especially those who compete.These are all great shots. and the Penny Farthing piece is interesting too.

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  7. Marilyn thank you so much for your kind comment.

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