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Saturday, 22 September 2012

Sepia Saturday 144; many small arms;


As far as I know and I could not find any old family photos of convicts or people with missing heads or limbs in my family album; I admit perhaps the odd one got to much to the  side and  an arm or leg  is missing, but the heads are all there! No  convicts in my family .Many Australians are very proud  to have some, even if the ancestor just snatched a fine hanky she was transported  as the colony needed people! For the men a hanky was not enough, they poached a hare or snatched a horse and the result was transportation for seven years, but for most there was no return!  

I had to settle for some small innocents who were a little bothered by the sun while the photo was taken.Up went the little arms for protection. I think it is rather sweet.

I do not know who these children are.  I don't know who made the photo or where it was taken. The tiny girl  on the right with the spotted dress is Peter's youngest sister, Marianne; it is probably around 1943. There are six boys and two girls, perhaps  Kindergarten in the village.


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17 comments:

  1. I agree with you, it is an adorable picture!

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  2. A sweet photo indeed. Such cute little expressions on those faces.

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  3. I love old photos. This is a good one.

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  4. A lovely happy pitcure of the children.

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  5. As people with my family name contributed at least two convicts to Norfolk Island and Tasmania/Australia I have been suprised at just how many show up in Australia today. It would be too much to expect that one of the kids at this kindergarten is a descendant. They are a happy bunch.

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  6. It is amazing how quickly that automatic response of hand shielding eyes from the sun sets in. Well it does in your part of the world. Over here in Yorkshire people tend to be in their 20s before they realise that sunlight in the eyes could be painful. Its not that they are unusually slow to learn, its just that the sun so seldom shines.

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    1. Alan, you are right, here the sun is white and glaring in summer and it hurts the eyes. In winter it is better, the sun gets mellow.

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  7. Little darlings! It's a great photo.

    P.S. Also enjoyed looking at your Grevillea post. Beautiful plants. I'm quite sure I can't grow them here.

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    1. Christine, thank you, it would depend on your climate and soil. Grevillias are Proteas and sometimes can be a bit fussy. When they have the right conditions they are as tough as old boots.

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  8. What a cute photo of all those precious faces and little arms! I scrolled on down the page and enjoyed your photos of the koala too!

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    1. Thank you Kathy, glad you enjoyed them.

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  9. What adorable children! It's interesting to see the dress style for children in the early 1940s.

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    1. Wearing little dresses and aprons, not t-shirts and shorts. What I do not like if little girls are dressed as miniature adults, here was just a case against Target, to get more appropriate children's clothing.

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  10. Peter's sister is so sweet! It's strange isn't it that we never used to think of protecting children's eyes from harsh sunlight. That pose was quite a familar one. These days chldren often have ther own sunglasses.

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  11. I'm convinced they're all actors in an old horror film. They're recoiling in horror at the aliens who have just arrived. Apparently the director forgot to tell them to not just cover the eyes, but to also look scared. These munchkins look to be happy to see the monster.

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  12. Very cute picture. So funny how they're all shielding their eyes. It must have been a very sunny day. Most of the children look happy and well taken care of.

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